The Collective

Col•lec•tive (n) \kə-ˈlék-tiv (n.): “Parts assembled into or viewed as a whole”

Monday, May 2, 2011

Chloé on the Cello

Chloé
The Baby Blue Sound Collective is proud to have so many talented musicians who dedicate their time, outside of their already dedicated medical careers, to play with us to raise awareness for congenital heart disease.


Meet ChloéChloé works in the Intensive Care Nursery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. She has also worked at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Denver Children's and St Christopher's Children's Hospital. 


In addition to playing with the Baby Blue Sound Collective, Chloé has also been doing recordings and gigs with Shutters, a band led by her brother. They grew up playing music together and Shutters is their first official collaboration. You can visit their band page on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/shuttersmusic


During her time as a nurse at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) she also performed at the bereavement ceremonies and holiday concerts with Patrick Lipawen, a Music Therapist at CHOP. Patrick was the one who actually encouraged her to dust off her cello and get playing again. 


Chloé met Patrick through her sister, Kelsey. Kelsey was a patient at CHOP for many years after her diagnosis with cancer in 1998.  Chloé lost Kelsey to cancer in 2005 but fondly shares special memories of their time together. And musical talent clearly runs in the family  - Kelsey was a hugely talented artist and musician herself (jazz piano). In her last days, Kelsey, Chloé and their two other siblings would sit at the piano at the entrance to the oncology unit and sing songs together or jam in the music therapy room. 


In Chloé's own words:
I love having a job that allows me time to play music. It is such a huge and beautiful part of life. Im so glad all of these events have given me an impetus and an opportunity to play, and to raise money for such an excellent cause. Music brings people together in such an amazing way. It is nice to work with all of these fellow practitioners and see their (hidden!) talents. I think it helps us see each other in a new light, not just for who we are at work. 
I love being a nurse. To the kids and also to the families. People often say - "I dont know how you do it - seeing all those sick children". My reply has always been - I love being there, down in the trenches with people who are going through these hard times. I like being able to make each day of their trial just a little easier by sharing my light. I was touched in the same way by the beautiful people who cared for my sister and our family. I vow that if I am ever going to work dreading what I do, than it is time to find a new job or make some change happen. 


Thank you for sharing your music, and your story, with us Chloé.  


Come out to hear her play with the Baby Blue Sound Collective on May 9th at World Cafe Live.  Visit www.babybluesc.com for tickets.

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Who We Are


The Baby Blue Sound Collective is an ensemble featuring pediatric cardiologists, surgeons, nurses, therapists and other medical professionals from Children's Hospitals around the world. In their day jobs, most of the group takes care of children with heart disease; but most are also researchers, educators and lecturers. Past and present members hail from Australia, Canada, Costa Rica, Great Britain, Japan, South Africa, France and Norway, as well as over 15 different cardiovascular programs in the USA. The members of BBSC have found each other through a mutual interest in providing medical and nursing care for children and their families, as well as a love of music and the performing arts.

The BBSC has performed at many of the pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery medical conferences throughout the USA and Europe. The personnel are different for each and every performance, depending upon the location of the particular meeting and the performers who are on the course faculty or attending the meeting (see history). Performances have contained as few as three and as many as 30 members. The set lists and genres are then chosen based upon the composition of ‘the collective” and are as diverse as the members, including classical, jazz, pop, musical theater, blues and rock.

Music, Health Care and Advocacy for Congenital Heart Disease


Gil Wernovsky MD, Jeffrey Boris MD and Tom Karl MD organize the Collective, and together work with charities and patient groups that benefit children and young adults with heart disease. Congenital Heart Disease affects 1 in 100 children, is the leading cause of death from birth defects in infants, and is more common than juvenile diabetes, cystic fibrosis and all forms of childhood cancer—combined. Over 11,000 children under one year of age require open heart surgery in the US alone, many of whom must stay in a hospital setting for weeks to months.

One of the missions of the BBSC is to support the children and their families in a “holistic” fashion. In addition to performing open heart surgery and other high-tech and intense treatments in our ‘day jobs’; we support grass roots organizations who provide aid and support to families going through the toughest times of their lives. Originally inspired by the efforts of Mona and Seth Barmash from The Congenital Heart Information Network (tchin.org) and Spencer’s Fund (www.tchin.org/spencersfund/), proceeds from our recorded music and performances will directly benefit important efforts not traditionally covered by medical bills: social services, care packages, child life, financial assistance for families far from home, and important therapies for hospitalized children (including music!).

While great strides have been made in caring for children with heart problems, many of which were fatal just 1-2 generations ago, there remain many questions about longer term outcomes. How will the children fare as they go through school? What are the challenges they will face? What are their strengths, and how may these be improved? The BBSC remains committed to helping to answer these questions: by tirelessly pursuing improved treatments in our ‘day jobs’, and by using our musical resources and international networking to support research aimed at improving quality of life for children and young adults with CHD.